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Receptor events and transduction in taste and olfaction

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Published by M. Dekker in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Taste -- Physiological aspects -- Congresses.,
  • Smell -- Physiological aspects -- Congresses.,
  • Chemoreceptors -- Congresses.,
  • Cellular signal transduction -- Congresses.,
  • Chemoreceptors -- physiology -- congresses.,
  • Signal Transduction -- congresses.,
  • Smell -- congresses.,
  • Taste -- congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Joseph G. Brand ... [et al.].
SeriesChemical senses ;, v. 1, Chemical senses (New York, N.Y.) ;, v. 1.
ContributionsBrand, Joseph G., International Symposium on Receptor Events and Transduction in Taste and Olfaction (1988 : Monell Chemical Senses Center)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP456 .R43 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiii, 529 p. :
Number of Pages529
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2197291M
ISBN 100824781627
LC Control Number89016999

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"Based on the International Symposium on Receptor Events and Transduction in Taste and Olfaction held at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, March , "--Preface. Description: xxiii, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm. By EL James - ## Book Chemical Senses Receptor Events And Transduction In Taste And Olfaction ##, this book focuses on the initial biochemical and biophysical aspects of taste and olfaction it is intended for a wide audience both those already familiar wit chemical senses receptor events and transduction in taste and olfacti chemical senses receptor events and transduction in taste and olfaction medicine health science books .   In humans, there are five primary tastes; each taste has only one corresponding type of receptor. Thus, like olfaction, each receptor is specific to its stimulus (tastant). Transduction of the five tastes happens through different mechanisms that reflect the molecular composition of the tastant. Chemoreception, in particular, is a key sensory system, which is largely mediated by olfactory and taste receptors [5] [6] [7]. In the human genome, olfactory receptors (ORs) constitute the.

  These taste receptors detect tastants that signal sweet, salty, sour, or bitter. Recently, a fifth taste, called umami, has been identified- the savory, meaty taste that originates from amino acids and we commonly associate with MSG (monosodium glutamate). Similar to smell, taste is sensed by the diffusion of specific molecules into the taste buds. Once the G-protein coupled receptor is activated, the transduction pathway is the same as bitter and sweet taste cells. Figure 7. High protein foods activate G-protein receptors, which cause second messenger actions that open sodium ion channels and release calcium from intracellular stores, leading to eventual efflux of ATP into the synapse. Taste and smell. Taste, also called gustation, and smell, also called olfaction, are the most interconnected senses in that both involve molecules of the stimulus entering the body and bonding to receptors. Smell lets an animal sense the presence of food or other animals—whether potential mates, predators, or prey—or other chemicals in the. In humans, there are five primary tastes; each taste has only one corresponding type of receptor. Thus, like olfaction, each receptor is specific to its stimulus (tastant). Transduction of the five tastes happens through different mechanisms that reflect the molecular composition of the tastant.

Reception and Transduction. Odorants (odor molecules) enter the nose and dissolve in the olfactory epithelium, the mucosa at the back of the nasal cavity (as illustrated in Figure 1).The olfactory epithelium is a collection of specialized olfactory receptors in the back of the nasal cavity that spans an area about 5 cm 2 in humans. Recall that sensory cells are neurons.   Miyoshi, M. A., Abe, K. & Emori, Y. IP3 receptor type 3 and PLCβ2 are co-expressed with taste receptors T1R and T2R in rat taste bud cells. Chem. Sen – (). The many taste buds on our tongues and inside our mouths allow us to detect six basic taste sensations: sweet, salty, sour, bitter, piquancy, and umami. In olfaction, transduction occurs as airborne chemicals that are inhaled through the nostrils are detected by receptors in the olfactory membrane. In this compendium of current studies on olfaction and taste - the most comprehensive yet to appear in this series - the chemical senses are elucidated from points of view ranging from anatomy, electrophysiology, molecular biology (especially chemoreceptor gene cloning), biochemistry, and psychophysics to the latest clinical and technological applications of chemosensory research.